Tarlac Expansion, Philippines

Technical Details:

Capacity: 20,045 kWp
Number of modules: 62 400
Inverter: Fronius
Commisioning: April 2019
Greencity role:Project Management/Owners Engineer


Solarpark, Pringgabaya Indonesia

Technical Details:

Capacity: 7,000 kWp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Dec 2018
Greencity role:Consultant, Owner: Vena Energy


Solarpark, Selong Inonesia

Technical Details:

Capacity: 7,000 kWp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Jan 2019
Greencity role: Consultant
Owner: Vena Energy


Solarpark, Sengkol Indonesia

Technical Details:

Capacity: 7,000 kWp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Dec 2018
Greencity role: Consultant
Owner: Vena Energy


Solarpark, Likupang Indonesia

Technical Details:

Capacity: 21,000 kWp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Jan 2019
Greencity role: Consultant, Owner: Vena Energy


Solarpark, Yunlin Taiwan

Technical Details:

Capacity: 9,530 kWp
Number of modules: 30 0098
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Dec 2018
Greencity role:Project Management/Owners Engineer
Owner: Vena Energy

 


Solarpark, Yunlin Taiwan

Technical Details:

Capacity: 5,056 kWp
Number of modules: 15 298
Modultyp: REC 345 Wp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Dec 2017
Greencity role:Project Management/Owners Engineer
Owner: Equis Energy


Solarpark, Yunlin Taiwan

Technical Details:

Capacity: 5,167 kWp
Number of modules: 15 388
Modultyp: REC 345 Wp
Inverter: Schneider
Commisioning: Dec 2017
Greencity role:Project Management/Owners Engineer
Owner: Equis Energy


Solarpark, Bataan Philippines


Technical Details:

Capacity: 18 184 kWp
Number of modules: 80 440
Modultyp: JA Solar 265 Wp
Inverter: SMA
Commisioning: March 2016
CO2 saving per year: 84 817 tons
Project Management/Owners Engineer


Solarpark, Tarlac Philippines


Technical Details:

Capacity: 50 146 kWp
Number of modules: 203 419
Modultyp: JA Solar 265 Wp
Inverter: SMA
Commisioning: Jan 2016
CO2 saving per year: 114 897 tons
Project Management/Owners Engineer


Solarpark, Raslac Philippines


Technical Details:

Capacity: 13 124 kWp
Number of modules: 40 439
Modultyp: JA Solar 265 Wp
Inverter: SMA
Commisioning: Dec 2015
CO2 saving per year: 24 897 tons
Project Management/Owners Engineer


Solarpark, Burgos/Philippines


Technical Details:

Capacity: 4 160 kWp
Number of modules: 13 420
Modultyp: BYD 310 Wp
Inverter: Danfoss MLX 60
Commisioning: March 2015
CO2 saving per year: 3 277 tons
Construction Management


Solarpark, Ubon/Thailand


Technical Details:

Capacity: 48 377 kWp
Number of modules: 163 989
Modultyp: Canadian solar 295Wp
Inverter: Schneider XC 680
Commisioning: July 2013
CO2 saving per year: 48 377 tons
Construction Management


Solarpark, Phalodi/India


Technical Details:

Capacity:18 690 kWp
Number of modules: 241 162
Modultyp: First Solar FS 377
Inverter: SMA
Commisioning: Dec. 2012
CO2 saving per year: 24 000 tons
Construction Management


Solarpark, Palacios/Spain


Technical Details:

Capacity: 2.010 KWp
Number of modules: 31.680
Modultyp: First Solar FS 272
Inverter: Siemens IP 4600
Commisioning: August 2008
CO2 saving per year: 2.300 tons



Holz 100, Kehl


Technical Details:

Capacity: 667 kWp
Number of modules: 2.900
Modultyp: SuntecPower STP 230 Wp
Inverter: Solarmax C-serie, SMA
Commisioning: Dec. 2009
CO2 saving per year: 448tons


Creaton AG, Weroth


Technical Details:

Capacity :748 kWp
Number of modules: 3.252
Modultyp: Yingli 230 Wp
Inverter: Solarmax C-serie, Danfoss
Commisioning: June 2010
CO2 saving per year: 485 tons


Creaton AG, Malsch


Technical Details:

Capacity: 1 012 kWp
Number of modules: 4.400
Modultyp: Yingli 230 Wp
Inverter: Solarmax C-serie
Commisioning: June 2010
CO2 saving per year: 681 tons


Creaton AG, Dorfen


Technical Details:

Capacity: 1 008 kWp
Number of modules: 4.383
Modultyp: Yingli 230 Wp
Inverter: Solarmax C-serie
Commisioning: June 2010
CO2 saving per year: 678 tons


Gewerbeschule, Bühl


Technical Details:

Capacity: 368 KWp
Number of modules: 2.329
Modultyp: Schüco S 158-SP
Inverter: Sunny Central 150 kW, SMA 5000
Commisioning: June 2004
CO2 saving per year: 231 tons


Hebelschule, Kehl


Technical Details:

Capacity: 165 KWp
Number of modules: 2.129
Modultyp: First SOlar FS 277
Inverter: SMA: SMR 11.000
Commisioning: June 2009
CO2 saving per year: 112 tons


FA. Schoeck AG, Baden

 
Technical Details:

Capacity: 102 KWp
Number of modules: 606
Modultyp: IBC-Megaline, Sharp 180
Inverter: SMA, various
Commisioning: July 2000
CO2 saving per year: 67 tons


Max-Slevogt-Gym, Landau


Technical Details:

Capacity: 57,75 KWp
Number of modules: 460
Modultyp: Schüco S 125-SP
Inverter: SMA 5000, 1700
Commisioning: September 2003
CO2 saving per year: 36 tons



Realschule, Bühl


Technical Details:

Capacity: 57,3 KWp
Number of modules: 250
Modultyp: Sharp 175, Schüco S 158
Inverter: SMA 5000
Commisioning: December 2004
CO2 saving per year: 39 tons



Schulzentrum, Efringen


Technical Details:

Capacity: 39,8 KWp
Number of modules: 221
Modultyp: Suntech power STP 180 W
Inverter: SMA 7000 HV
Commisioning: July 2009
CO2 saving per year: 28 tons



Lowenergyhouse, Denkingen


Technical Details:

Capacity: 20.86 KWp
Number of modules: 282
Modultyp: First Solar FS 272, 275
Inverter: SMA 7000 HV
Commisioning: July 2008
CO2 saving per year: 15 tons



Here has never been a better time to go solar and maximize your energy savings while reducing greenhouse gases.

When you install solar power, you are helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Right now is the best time to install solar on your home or building. Advances in technology and efficiency are making solar more cost-competitive with other electricity sources like coal-fired power. However, solar power has many other advantages over grid-supplied electricity for the homeowner or business owner. Prices are getting lower but waiting also has some risks. Here are some reasons why you should install solar panels now.

Increased efficiency, production and lower cost

Solar panels are being produced quicker and cheaper than ever before. The cost of a photovoltaic panel has fallen from more than US$6 a watt 30 years ago.
Photovoltaic panels and other forms of solar power have also seen substantial gains in efficiency recently. While the average silicon-based photovoltaic cell converts about 14% of the sun’s energy into electricity, some silicon-based photovoltaic panels can now achieve 40% efficiency and their lightweight, relatively inexpensive counterparts, thin-film photovoltaics, aren’t far behind the average silicon photovoltaics.
Solar installations for your home or business are smaller and more powerful and cheaper than ever before. The only thing that will make them more expensive is when demand outpaces production, something to think about as Solar Power demand ramps up in the next few years.

Energy price stability

It’s simple, when you install a photovoltaic system on your home or business, you know how much electricity it will produce annually, how much money you’ll have to pay (if you had to finance the system with a loan or payment purchase agreement), and whether or not you’ll have to buy any additional electricity. As energy prices skyrocket all around you, you can forecast energy prices for the years to come. Looking back, since 1991 energy prices have risen ~48% in the US. After any financing is paid back you get free electricity! And if your system is set up for net metering, you can actually make money by feeding any extra electricity produced by your system back into the grid.

Increase building value

Whether it’s a home or business, solar installations increase a building’s value.CNN Money reported in 2006 that zeroing out a home’s electric bill with a solar installation could increase the value of a home by up to $20,000. This might not appear to be as much as you first paid for the system, but when considering how much you saved in electricity bills while using the solar system and how much it added value to your home at sales time, it’s a sound investment. And the DOE in its publication, A Homebuilder’s Guide to Going Solar, says that “Solar homes sell at up to twice the rate of their conventional counterparts.”

Support your local economy

By installing solar power on your home or business, you help keep people employed locally and support your local economy. Even after the local installers have put the system up, maintenance people need to be local to help perform any routine maintenance or your system.

Energy reliability

If you choose to install a solar power system with a battery backup that charges when the system is producing energy, solar provides absolute electric reliability, no more blackouts or brownouts when the grid fails. Even if you’re in a major metropolis major power failures can occur. By installing a solar power system you have reliable, predictable power, no matter what happens.

Thailand hast the highest peak of energy consuming during daytime

This is exact when you power plant produces energy. If you lease your roof, you get a monthly income and you reduce greenhouse gas emi


History of solar


With the recent rise in energy costs many people have been looking to alternative sources of energy. One of the greatest energy sources (our sun) is readily available for the taking. We just need to be able to harness it's power. For those interested, below is a brief history of how solar power came to be.

The history of photovoltaic energy (aka. solar cells) started way back in 1876. William Grylls Adams along with a student of his, Richard Day, discovered that when selenium was exposed to light, it produced electricity. An electricity expert, Werner von Siemens, stated that the discovery was "scientifically of the most far-reaching importance". The selenium cells were not efficient, but it was proved that light, without heat or moving parts, could be converted into electricity.

In 1953, Calvin Fuller, Gerald Pearson, and Daryl Chapin, discovered the silicon solar cell. This cell actually produced enough electricity and was efficient enough to run small electrical devices. The New York Times stated that this discovery was "the beginning of a new era, leading eventually to the realization of harnessing the almost limitless energy of the sun for the uses of civilization."

The year is 1956, and the first solar cells are available commercially. The cost however is far from the reach of everyday people. At US$300 for a 1 watt solar cell, the expense was far beyond anyone's means. 1956 started showing us the first solar cells used in toys and radios. These novelty items were the first item to have solar cells available to consumers.

.In the late 1950's and early 1960's satellites in the USA's and Soviet's space program were powered by solar cells and in the late 1960's solar power was basically the standard for powering space bound satellites.

In the early 1970's a way to lower to cost of solar cells was discovered. This brought the price down from $100 per watt to around $20 per watt. This research was spearheaded by Exxon. Most off-shore oil rigs used the solar cells to power the waning lights on the top of the rigs.

The period from the 1970's to the 1990's saw quite a change in the usage of solar cells. They began showing up on railroad crossings, in remote places to power homes, Australia used solar cells in their microwave towers to expand their telecommunication capabilities. Even desert regions saw solar power bring water to the soil where line fed power was not an option!

Today we see solar cells in a wide variety of places. You may see solar powered cars. There is even a solar powered aircraft that has flown higher than any other aircraft with the exception of the Blackbird. With the cost of solar cells well within everyone's budget, solar power has never looked so tempting.

Recently new technology has given us screen printed solar cells, and a solar fabric that can be used to side a house, even solar shingles that install on our roofs. International markets have opened up and solar panel manufacturers are now playing a key role in the solar power industry.